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Places

Take an art tour in Frankfurt

As the financial center of Germany, you might think that Frankfurt is all about business and fairs. But there’s actually a great deal to explore, from a spectacular skyline to a botanical garden and impressive museums.

Home to the European Central Bank and several major trade fairs, Frankfurt attracts a large number of business travelers each year. But it is not all just banks and business in the city on the river Main. When the deals are closed and the trade fair has come to an end, Frankfurt offers a wide choice of cultural experiences – from Goethe to skyscrapers.

Photo: Städel Museum

Städel Museum

The Städel Museum on the south bank of the Main is Frankfurt’s biggest and most famous museum. Typical for Frankfurt, it was founded by the rich banker Johann Friedrich Städel back in 1815, which makes it Germany’s oldest museum foundation.Today, its collection covers more than 3,000 paintings, 660 sculptures, 4,600 photographs and 100,000 drawings and prints, of which a large part belongs to the permanent exhibition.Behind the neoclassical façade of the main building, 700 years of European art history is presented with works spanning from Albrecht Dürer and Rembrandt, over paintings by Monet and Picasso and up to contemporary artists such as Wolfgang Tillmans’ photography.

Städel Museum

Schaumainkai 63, Frankfurt

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Opening hours: Tuesday, Wednesday, Saturday, Sunday 10am-6pm, Thursday & Friday 10am-9pm. Entrance: €14

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Schirn Kunsthalle

Anyone with the slightest interest in art should not miss the Schirn Kunsthalle while in Frankfurt. Since opening in 1986, the exhibition hall covering 2,000 sq m divided into five floors right next to the old town, has been one of Europe´s most renowned.Famous for its extensive, ambitious retrospective exhibition of modern and contemporary artists such as Henri Matisse, Yoko Ono and Edvard Munch, the “Schirn,” whose name derives from the historical open sales booths of Frankfurt, attracts more than 400,000 visitors each year. Besides presenting the works of famous artists, Schirn also tries to take a new grip on art and its role in society. Be prepared to be surprised.

Schirn Kunsthalle

Römerberg 6, Frankfurt

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Opening hours: Tuesday, Friday, Saturday, Sunday 10am-7pm, Wednesday & Thursday 10am-10pm.

Photo: Bundesbank

Money, money, money

It comes as no surprise that the business city of Frankfurt also has its own money museum. On the grounds of the German Central Bank, the “Bundesbank,”, there’s also an exhibition with the aim to explain what money is all about and how it works. And even though the museum houses an impressive collection of old notes and coins, the main experience is more of an interactive one. Learn about the role of money throughout history and where its value comes from, and don’t miss the possibility to flex your muscles and try out your strength by lifting a real gold bar. Also, with free entrance you can leave your own money at home.

Bundesbank

Wilhelm-Epstein-Strasse 14, Frankfurt

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Opening hours: Monday – Friday & Sunday 9am-5pm. Entrance: Free

Photo: Shutterstock

Skyscraper city

Frankfurt am Main also goes by the name “Mainhattan” and there’s a good reason why.The 14 skyscrapers in the city center create a skyline unmatched by any other European city. And even though Frankfurt is no longer home to the highest single building in Europe, it still has the coolest and most breath-taking silhouette of the continent.Boat tours on the river Main offer good views of the skyscrapers, while those who prefer solid ground beneath their feet should head to the ”Alte Brücke” bridge, which is a popular spot among photographers at sunset. For the right view from up high, the observation deck of the 200m high ”Main Tower” is a good choice for that perfect image for your Instagram-account.

Main Tower

Main Tower opening hours Sunday – Thursday: 10am-9pm. Winter until 7pm Friday – Saturday: 10am-11pm. Winter until 9pm Entrance: 7,50 Euro

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Palmengarten

The ”Palm Garden” in the neighborhood of Westend is a much needed, calm oasis in the bustling business city. Opened in 1871, by the Duke of Nassau, who needed a place to store his large collection of tropical plants, the ”Palmengarten” has showcased a slice of an exotic world for almost 150 years.With up to 100-year-old palm trees, tropical flowers and colorful rhododendrons, cactus garden, lakes with rowing boats and even a waterfall, this 22-hectare botanical garden can soothe the mind of even the most stressed out business traveler.Several different climate zones and their plants are exhibited, spanning from jungle-like humid heat in the Tropicarium, to much cooler temperatures in the Sub-Antarctic House.During the year, many events take place in the garden, such as The Rose and Light Festival in June and jazz, pop, blues and world-music concerts during the summer months.And with a 2-star restaurant within the park as well, the Palm Garden definitely offers something for everyone.

Palmengarten

Siesmayerstraße 61, Frankfurt

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Opening hours: Feb – Oct daily 9am-6pm, Nov – Jan 9am-4pm

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Römerberg, the “new old town” and Goethe

With its banks and modern skyscrapers, it’s sometimes easy to forget that Frankfurt has a long history dating back to the Roman times. Since the Middle Ages, Frankfurt has been a European center for politics and, of course, business.Even though much of the old town was destroyed during WW2, many historical buildings, such as the beautiful “Römerberg” square, with the city hall and surrounding colorful timber-frame houses, have been rebuilt.The same goes for the birth house of Frankfurt’s most famous citizen, Johann Wolfgang von Goethe, and the “Kaiserdom” cathedral whose tower offers a stunning view over the Old Town and Frankfurt’s famous skyline for those who manage to climb the 324 stairs to the top.Over the years, the reconstruction and rebuilding of its rich history has become a Frankfurt specialty. The latest addition is the newly finished “new old town,” where carefully made reconstructions of historical building stand side by side with modern interpretations of how Frankfurt’s Old Town once looked.

Frankfurt’s Old Town

Römerberg 26, Frankfurt am Main

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Last edited: February 27, 2019

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